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A Termite Inspection Contract Was Eaten By Termites During The Latest Infestation Crisis In Georgia

June 25th, 2018

A Termite Inspection Contract Was Eaten By Termites During The Latest Infestation Crisis In Georgia

Anybody who fancies him or herself a termite expert is certainly familiar with the Formosan subterranean termite and the destruction that they are capable of inflicting on manmade structures. Since the 1960s this termite species has been causing extensive structural damages in the state of Louisiana. Sometime later, Formosans became problematic insect pests within the state of Florida. Since this species requires tropical climatic conditions to survive, it mostly sticks to the Gulf Coast. Although these termites are common on both the eastern and western ends of the Gulf region, they are far less numerous in the states located in between Louisiana and Florida. However, this does not mean that Formosans don’t also wreak havoc in these states as well. Long after the Formosan termite established itself in Louisiana and Florida, the state of Georgia began seeing Formosan termite damages. Since 1993, several dozen infestation sites have been discovered in Georgia. Taxpayers in Georgia pay somewhere between two and three hundred million dollars per year controlling termites and repairing the damage that they cause to structures. Two residents of Georgia, Alvin Jackson and Beth Myers, are currently seeing their homes literally cave-in due to widespread termite infestations that have yet to be eradicated.

Beth Myers and her husband live within a home that was built by Beth’s father back in 1966. Beth has lived in the home since she was thirteen. For Beth, her home has both monetary and sentimental value, which is why she doesn’t like seeing termites literally take it down piece by piece. The floors located within the guest bathroom have partially collapsed. The toilet is currently hanging from its plumbing, as the floor beneath the toilet is now completely gone. Moisture from the crawlspace below the bathroom floor has contributed to mold formation within the home. Beth’s termite infestation is so widespread that even her termite inspection paperwork has been largely consumed by termites. Alvin Jackson, another Georgia resident, recently saw his home completely destroyed after a termite infestation was found on a wooden structure that supported the weight of his home. This is why regular termite inspections are a must; unless you live in Alaska, of course.

Have you ever found any wooden object that had become almost entirely consumed by termites?

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